Posts Tagged: vintage camera

Yashica Mat 124G :: Three Photos

Fallen Leaves in the Pond Ice Oxford Street at Night Mom and Canela

11.02.19 – One of my great blog / photo sins of the last year is that I have not posted most of the photos I have taken. The three photos above from last November 2018 taken with a vintage Yashica Mat 124G loaded with Cinestill 800T film are a good example. I posted a few photos from this roll of 120 tungsten film here and there but not here here.

Today, I am resolving my forgetfulness by posting the three best photos from the Cinestill 800T taken in November 2018. The pond ice and my Mom holding her chihuahua were taken on the 8th or 9th of November 2018 in Bishop, California, and the blurred photo of the London double decker bus on Oxford Street was taken on November 24th of 2018.

I have been searching for a in good working order Twin Lens Reflex camera for sometime, of which the thift store Rollei was a fail when I found the Yashica on Etsy for a very reasonable price in early October 2018. Using a TLR is a very different way of shooting film and I was not necessarily fond of the results I got from the first two rolls. Since then, I have only shot one more roll of 120 film in the camera and I have been alternating between using the Sunny 16 rule and an external light meter, as I have more than a faint suspicion that this camera overexposes.

Anywhoo, the above are my three favorite shots from the Yashica TLR from 2018. And why am I posting these photos now? I put in a roll of 400 ISO something in the camera last winter (Jan or Feb 2019) and just found the camera in a box the other day, so I have been shooting with it this week to use the roll of film and see if my thoughts that it overexposes are true. Thus, one year later…

A year late, but better than never.

Scruffy and Belle at Dog Beach, The ADOX Camera Version

Scruffy and Belle at Dog Beach, photo taken with a vintage film camera
Tues 12.27.11 – Photo of Scruffy McDoglet and Belle le Cane taken yesterday at Dog Beach in Huntington Beach, Calif, with Thomas Bertling’s ADOX Golf 63 1950s era vintage bellows range finder medium format camera. I used Fujifilm 120 color film at 200 ISO and got the film developed and printed at Fromex in Long Beach.
I am very pleased at the results as Thomas did not think the camera worked any longer as it was given to him by an aunt who had it since the 1950s and neither of us had a manual or much of an idea how it should work. I took the ADOX to Samy’s Camera in Santa Ana yesterday morning to see if the folks at the film counter would be able to help me and they did by determining that 120 film would fit in the canister.
The first few shots on the roll were taken by complete trial and error as I tried to figure out how to advance the film, as well as the settings of the f-stop and the shutter speed in conjunction with the focus ring as all three are interconnected at the end of the bellows on the lens with out much explanation and no light meter. When I got to Dog Beach, I used the Nikon D70s’ light meter settings to determine that at 200 ISO, I should shoot at f22 and 1/200th shutter speed, as the light declined and the sun set, I switched it to f11 at 1/50th shutter speed.
The ADOX Golf 63 has the following available settings:
F-stops: 6.3, 8, 11, and 22
Shutter speeds: B, 1/25th, 1/50th, and 1/200th
Focal length: 1 meter to 20 meters and an infinity setting
There is no ability to set ISO.
I am very pleased on how well the photos turned out since I was guest-imating on focus, f-stop, and shutter speed. Why was I guessing on focus? The ADOX is a range finder camera and I don’t have a siting attachment for it, so I was looking through the little eye hole that does not change in focus at all as you turn the focal ring.
The first roll from the ADOX Golf 63 is here at Flickr so you can see all 12 photos. I just scanned them and did not do any photo editing. The color is pretty accurate to the printed photos, and any grain is from the photo paper and spots on my scanner, as the actual printed photos are wonderfully clear. The vignetting is a result of the square medium format film and the size of the lens/bellows set up.
All in all the whole experiment is/was so successful that I am taking the ADOX on vacation with me, so expect more photos, printed and scanned.